Diabetes Action Month 2016

11 November 2016

 

Today is World Diabetes Day. It promotes the importance of diabetic screening to ensure early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes to reduce the risk of serious complications. World Diabetes Day is part of Diabetes Action Month; an event which aims to highlight the impact of diabetes on everyday New Zealanders and their families.
There are 3 types of diabetes 
Type 1: People with type 1 diabetes produce very little or no insulin and require daily injections of insulin to control blood glucose.
Type 2: accounts for up to 90% of all cases of diabetes, this diabetes can initially be managed with healthy diet and exercise. However, as the disease progresses oral medication and insulin may be needed.
Gestational Diabetes (GDM): this is diagnosed during pregnancy for women. Unlike type 1 or type 2, it is generally temporary while pregnant however the risk of developing diabetes type 2 is higher in the future.
This year’s Diabetes Action Month theme is ‘Eyes on Diabetes’. 
Here at Hauora Tairāwhiti we have a multi-disciplinary approach to diabetes care which includes specialists from many departments including Tui Te Ora, Outpatients, Dietetics and Medical and Technical.
Retinal screening plays a huge part in the diagnosis of diabetes, and the prevention of complications due to diabetes.
Physiotherapist Trudie Botma knows all too well how important our eye testing and screening services are “I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when I was 5 years old. It is something I have always managed well.” However, in September Trudie woke up with almost complete loss of vision in her right eye. After contacting Diabetes Clinical Nurse Specialist Lisa Smith, Trudie was assessed by Eye Clinic Nurse Rachel Cook and the Locum Ophthalmologist the same day to determine the cause and begin treatment. 
Diabetes Clinical Nurse Specialist Lisa Smith commented; “going blind is a complication of diabetes that all diabetics are aware of. We make sure that people know exactly what to do if they notice any changes in their eye health; these complications are taken very seriously and we always aim to see the patient as soon as possible.”
Trudie was very impressed with the service “waking up and realising that I couldn’t see properly was very scary. It was so comforting to be able to see a specialist quickly, and very reassuring that they were able to help me straight away.”  Trudie continued “this is the biggest complication I have had from diabetes, it was a stark reminder of the complications I could suffer and the huge impact losing my sight would have on my career, family and lifestyle. This experience has highlighted how important it is to stay on top of my condition and check out any changes to my health as soon as possible.”
To find out more about diabetes action month, click here.

Monday 14 November is World Diabetes Day. It promotes the importance of diabetic screening to ensure early diagnosis and treatment to reduce the risk of serious complications. World Diabetes Day is part of Diabetes Action Month; an event which aims to highlight the impact of diabetes on everyday New Zealanders and their families.

There are 3 types of diabetes 

Type 1: People with type 1 diabetes produce very little or no insulin and require daily injections of insulin to control blood glucose.

Type 2: accounts for up to 90% of all cases of diabetes, this diabetes can initially be managed with healthy diet and exercise. However, as the disease progresses oral medication and insulin may be needed.

Gestational Diabetes (GDM): this is diagnosed during pregnancy for women. Unlike type 1 or type 2, it is generally temporary while pregnant however the risk of developing diabetes type 2 is higher in the future.

This year’s Diabetes Action Month theme is ‘Eyes on Diabetes’. 

Here at Hauora Tairāwhiti we have a multi-disciplinary approach to diabetes care which includes specialists from many departments including Tui Te Ora, Outpatients, Dietetics and Medical and Technical.

Retinal screening plays a huge part in the diagnosis of diabetes, and the prevention of complications due to diabetes.

Physiotherapist Trudie Botma knows all too well how important our eye testing and screening services are “I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when I was 5 years old. It is something I have always managed well.” However, in September Trudie woke up with almost complete loss of vision in her right eye. After contacting Diabetes Clinical Nurse Specialist Lisa Smith, Trudie was assessed by Eye Clinic Nurse Rachel Cook and the Locum Ophthalmologist the same day to determine the cause and begin treatment. 

Diabetes Clinical Nurse Specialist Lisa Smith commented; “going blind is a complication of diabetes that all diabetics are aware of. We make sure that people know exactly what to do if they notice any changes in their eye health; these complications are taken very seriously and we always aim to see the patient as soon as possible.”

Trudie was very impressed with the service “waking up and realising that I couldn’t see properly was very scary. It was so comforting to be able to see a specialist quickly, and very reassuring that they were able to help me straight away.”  Trudie continued “this is the biggest complication I have had from diabetes, it was a stark reminder of the complications I could suffer and the huge impact losing my sight would have on my career, family and lifestyle. This experience has highlighted how important it is to stay on top of my condition and check out any changes to my health as soon as possible.”

To find out more about diabetes action month, click here.