What we can do for others

28 April 2016

 

The spirit that is embodied in our country and comes out publicly on ANZAC day is one of caring for, and acting in, the best interest of others. Seeing the large crowd at the ANZAC day commemorations yesterday, the many family groups and the nursing contingent in the parade, brought home to me the contributions made over the years and the fact these are never forgotten.
 
In a parallel way our own organisation is built upon caring and action. It would not exist if people in our community did not have a need for health services but we would be doing those very people an injustice if we weren’t a step ahead, thinking of what more we can do or how we can continue to deliver tomorrow, better.
This was really brought home to me, once more, when I attended a meeting with the Director of Mental Health – Dr John Crawshaw. John has a regular schedule of visiting DHBs to see how services are developing and identifying any issues he should address in his role as the lead clinician for mental health services across the country. To say that he was impressed with the initiatives taken by our local services – those provided by Hauora Tairāwhiti, the community providers, primary care and our funder team – is a distinct under-statement. John has identified that our integrated approach, with the focus on recovery, and the concentration also on improving physical health issues for people with mental health challenges, is a model for other parts of the country. Our teams, guided by the people and their families who are receiving the services, are at the forefront of achieving better health outcomes, not just in mental health but across all the dimensions of health.
It was a pleasure to talk to John, most importantly for his commendation of the initiative, drive, courage and determination of so many across the services here in Tairāwhiti. This really was an example of “what we can do for others” in action.

The spirit that is embodied in our country and comes out publicly on ANZAC day is one of caring for, and acting in, the best interest of others. Seeing the large crowd at the ANZAC day commemorations yesterday, the many family groups and the nursing contingent in the parade, brought home to me the contributions made over the years and the fact these are never forgotten.

In a parallel way our own organisation is built upon caring and action. It would not exist if people in our community did not have a need for health services but we would be doing those very people an injustice if we weren’t a step ahead, thinking of what more we can do or how we can continue to deliver tomorrow, better.

This was really brought home to me, once more, when I attended a meeting with the Director of Mental Health – Dr John Crawshaw. John has a regular schedule of visiting DHBs to see how services are developing and identifying any issues he should address in his role as the lead clinician for mental health services across the country. To say that he was impressed with the initiatives taken by our local services – those provided by Hauora Tairāwhiti, the community providers, primary care and our funder team – is a distinct under-statement. John has identified that our integrated approach, with the focus on recovery, and the concentration also on improving physical health issues for people with mental health challenges, is a model for other parts of the country. Our teams, guided by the people and their families who are receiving the services, are at the forefront of achieving better health outcomes, not just in mental health but across all the dimensions of health.

It was a pleasure to talk to John, most importantly for his commendation of the initiative, drive, courage and determination of so many across the services here in Tairāwhiti. This really was an example of “what we can do for others” in action.

 

Pictured L-R; Kataraina Miringaorangi, Kath Shanahan, John Crawshaw and Nepia Stewart.