Kylie Morrissey Wins NAMOT Innovation and Patient Safety Award

14 May 2016

Kylie Morresey won the Innovation and Patient Safety Award at the NAMOT Achievement Awards evening in May. She was nominated by Heather Robertson and Beetham Healthcare nursing staff.

Kylie has made a notable difference to the standard of care for residents in aged care facilities in Tairāwhiti, and has vastly improved access and support to the residents who now receive an effective, timely service that was unavailable prior to her employment at Three Rivers Medical Centre. 

Not only are residents now seen faster, but Kylie is able to spend more time with the resident, their whanau and nursing staff. Kylie’s work has significantly decreased the number of people from aged care coming to Gisborne Hospital Emergency Department, as well as the number of residents being unnecessarily admitted to hospital. 

Kylie has challenged traditional thinking with aged care residents. She has significantly reduced the amount of elderly people on more than four medications at one time as part of her work with  local GP’s. Kylie has introduced advance care planning that has notably reduced unnecessary hospital admissions/interventions, and improved patient’s comfort during the final stages of their life. Kylie ensures the client has adequate explanation of the effects, consequences and alternatives of proposed treatment options. She also takes a lead role when coaching colleagues to use information and culturally appropriate communication, to enable clients to make informed choices in complex situations.

Kylie is actively involved in the upskilling of aged residential care staff. The formal and informal education provided by Kylie around particular issues has proved valuable to nursing staff within the facilities. She identifies key issues for which solutions can be applied, determine patterns and provides education to support the learning across the community. For example she is working with some aged care providers on the use of standing orders.

Whilst humble, Kylie takes a leadership role in complex situations across settings and disciplines. As a well-respected member of the wider health care team, the value of her in the role is acknowledged by the willingness of senior people who support her. She works autonomously while being both interdependent and collaborative within the health care team. Feedback from the three practices involved in the aged care and aged care managers establishes the value of Kylie’s contribution, knowledge and skills. She provides professional advice to the Tairāwhiti falls prevention committee, the Health of Older persons Service Level Alliance Team (HOP SLAT) and the palliative integrated committee. She displays an in-depth understanding of the impact of the wider determinants of health including emerging health policy and demonstrates an advanced level of critical thinking using advanced knowledge and clinical decision making. As a direct result of the input from Kylie, the vitamin D prescribing rate in aged care is now one of the highest for a district in New Zealand. 

Kylie Morrissey won the Innovation and Patient Safety Award at the NAMOT Achievement Awards evening in May. She was nominated by Heather Robertson and Beetham Healthcare nursing staff.
Kylie has made a notable difference to the standard of care for residents in aged care facilities in Tairāwhiti, and has vastly improved access and support to the residents who now receive an effective, timely service that was unavailable prior to her employment at Three Rivers Medical Centre. 
Not only are residents now seen more quickly, but Kylie is able to spend more time with the resident as well as with their whanau and nursing staff. Kylie’s work has significantly decreased the number of people from aged care coming to Gisborne Hospital Emergency Department, as well as the number of residents being unnecessarily admitted to hospital. 
Kylie has challenged traditional thinking with aged care residents. She has significantly reduced the amount of elderly people on more than 4 medications at one time, using her own knowledge and expertise, and developing a close working relationship with local GP’s. Kylie has introduced advance care planning that has notably reduced unnecessary hospital admissions/interventions, and improved patient’s comfort during the final stages of their life. Kylie ensures the client has adequate explanation of the effects, consequences and alternatives of proposed treatment options. She also takes a lead role when coaching colleagues to use information and culturally appropriate communication, to enable clients to make informed choices in complex situations.
Kylie is actively involved in the upskilling of aged residential care staff. The formal and informal education provided by Kylie around particular issues has proved valuable to nursing staff within the facilities. She identifies key issues for which solutions can be applied, determine patterns and provides education to support the learning across the community. For example she is working with some aged care providers on the use of standing orders.
Whilst humble, Kylie takes a leadership role in complex situations across settings and disciplines. As a well-respected member of the wider health care team, the value of her in the role is acknowledged by the willingness of senior people who support her. She works autonomously while being both interdependent and collaborative within the health care team. Feedback from the three practices involved in the aged care and aged care managers establishes the value of Kylie’s contribution, knowledge and skills. She provides professional advice to the Tairāwhiti falls prevention committee, the Health of Older persons Service Level Alliance Team (HOP SLAT) and the palliative integrated committee. She displays an in-depth understanding of the impact of the wider determinants of health including emerging health policy and demonstrates an advanced level of critical thinking using advanced knowledge and clinical decision making. As a direct result of the input from Kylie, the vitamin D prescribing rate in aged care is now one of the highest for a district in New Z