Rural Midwives Learn to Respond to Emergencies

12 July 2016

Rural Midwives Learn to Respond to Emergencies
As part of  “working across the region” a team from Hauora Tairāwhiti’s Maternity & Neonatal Unit spent a day at Te Puia hospital.  The aim of the day was to develop skills when dealing with obstetric and neonatal emergencies in a rural setting. 
As part of the national Perinatal and Maternity Mortality Review committee process it is important that teams that cover wide geographical areas understand each other's skills and challenges.
This was the second workshop. The team ran a full day PROMPT (Practical Obstetric Multi-Professional Training) obstetric emergency workshop. The  13 attendees included two GPs, registered nurses and health care assistants who work in the hospital, a registered nurse working in the community and Corrina Parata, one of two rural midwives working in the area (the other midwife was providing care for a woman in labour). The discussion and “fresh eyes” generate new ways of working.    
This can lead to improvements of care and better support for our rural colleagues. 
Rural Midwife Corrina Parata explained why workshops like this are so important, "Remaining up to date and current with emergency care while some distance away from Gisborne can be difficult. Hosting workshops such as this one held at Te Puia Springs Hospital has numerous advantages for both staff and our community.”
Midwife Educator Liz Lee Taylor commented “All attendees embraced the day with great enthusiasm and joined in the role play scenarios.” 
Participants of the workshops also commented that;
“The workshop made me feel more confident having to deal with emergency situations”.
“The scenarios show us how to function as a team and trigger our ability to make clear clinical assessment and decisions and provide the emergency treatment and actions required”.
Clinical Midwife Manager, Mary-Clare Reilly added “education like this is endorsed from National bodies and is vital. Te Puia remains a vital link in our region and we value their input”. 

As part of  “working across the region” a team from Hauora Tairāwhiti’s Maternity & Neonatal Unit spent a day at Te Puia hospital.  The aim of the day was to develop skills when dealing with obstetric and neonatal emergencies in a rural setting. 

As part of the national Perinatal and Maternity Mortality Review committee process it is important that teams that cover wide geographical areas understand each other's skills and challenges.

This was the second workshop. The team ran a full day PROMPT (Practical Obstetric Multi-Professional Training) obstetric emergency workshop. The  13 attendees included two GPs, registered nurses and health care assistants who work in the hospital, a registered nurse working in the community and Corrina Parata, one of two rural midwives working in the area (the other midwife was providing care for a woman in labour). The discussion and “fresh eyes” generate new ways of working.    

This can lead to improvements of care and better support for our rural colleagues. 

Rural Midwife Corrina Parata explained why workshops like this are so important, "Remaining up to date and current with emergency care while some distance away from Gisborne can be difficult. Hosting workshops such as this one held at Te Puia Springs Hospital has numerous advantages for both staff and our community.”

Midwife Educator Liz Lee Taylor commented “All attendees embraced the day with great enthusiasm and joined in the role play scenarios.” 

Participants of the workshops also commented that;

“The workshop made me feel more confident having to deal with emergency situations”.

“The scenarios show us how to function as a team and trigger our ability to make clear clinical assessment and decisions and provide the emergency treatment and actions required”.

Clinical Midwife Manager, Mary-Clare Reilly added “education like this is endorsed from National bodies and is vital. Te Puia remains a vital link in our region and we value their input”.